Monday 2 November 2020: Healthy Life Day

Monday 2 November 20203pm UK time

Healthy Life Day: Cardiovascular benefits of a healthy life

Of interest to health professionals – senior or in training – and to members of the public anywhere in the world. Registrants – and panel contributors – for Healthy Life webinars have come from Europe, the Americas, the Middle-East, South Asia and South East Asia and Oceania.

The above webinar is being held on the international Healthy Life Day which is being organised by healthy heart charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust to raise awareness of the cardiovascular and broader benefits of a healthy life for everyone around the world. These are serious issues not just for wealthier countries but also for less developed countries around the world.
Click here for more on Global Burden of Disease.

Watch the World Healthy Life Day webinar

The session is intended for senior and junior health professionals as well as interested members of the public from anywhere in the world.

Click here for more on our panel

Our speakers and discussants will consider why avoiding the metabolic syndrome is so important and will discuss the benefits of better diet, exercise and a healthier sleep pattern for reducing and preventing risk from serious cardiovascular and related diseases.


Chair: Professor Donald Singer, Chair of CVRT and President, FPM, London

Reversing metabolic syndrome
Michael Lean, Professor of Human Nutrition, University of Glasgow

Sleep and cardiometabolic risk
Franco Cappuccio, Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine & Epidemiology, University of Warwick.

Discussants:
Professor Bernard Cheung, Editor-in-Chief, Postgraduate Medical Journal and Sun Chieh Yeh Heart Foundation Professor in Cardiovascular Therapeutics, University of Hong Kong
Ali Crewe-Smith, Chartered Physiotherapist, Impact Physiotherapy and Sports Injury Clinics, Warwickshire, UK

Background

Metabolic syndrome, risk of cardiovascular disease and benefits of changing to healthier life

Our speakers and discussants will consider why avoiding the metabolic syndrome is so important and discuss the benefits of better diet, exercise and a healthier sleep pattern for reducing and preventing risk from serious cardiovascular and related diseases.

Metabolic syndrome is increasingly common, affecting around one-third of adults in developed countries around the world. Metabolic syndrome is also becoming common in less developed countries. If you have metabolic syndrome or any of its components, changes to a healthier lifestyle can reduce the severity of the metabolic syndrome and even reverse it and delay or even prevent the development of serious health problems.

Metabolic syndrome is a combination of health abnormalities which together increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke and other serious cardiovascular disorders . Components of the metabolic syndrome include raised blood pressure, raised blood sugar, excess body fat around the waist, and abnormal blood fat levels (cholesterol and/or triglycerides). The greater number and severity of components you have of the metabolic syndrome, the higher the risk of serious disease. In addition, short and long sleep length are recently recognised important predictors of developing cardiovascular disorders. In particular, abnormal sleep length is associated with risk of developing the metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke and may increase risk of premature death.

Some useful links

Cappuccio FP, Miller MA. Sleep and Cardio-Metabolic Disease. Curr Cardiol Rep. 2017;19:110.

Cappuccio FP et al. Sleep duration predicts cardiovascular outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies. Eur Heart J. 2011;32:1484-92.

Han TS, Lean ME. A clinical perspective of obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. JRSM Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Feb 25;5:2048004016633371. doi: 10.1177/2048004016633371.

Chartered Society of Physiotherapy campaign: Love activity

ESCAPE pain. Online course to help you manage the pain of arthritis whilst remaining active.

Cardiac Rehab after heart attack or heart surgery

Physical Activity Guidelines from Public Health England

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